Project Leadership in a Changing World - 4th International Symposium

Online
November 13 2024


As we face a changing world it is imperative to think differently about projects and their leadership. The John Grill Institute for Project Leadership’s 2024 International Symposium on Project Leadership in a Changing World will discuss the latest insights through a series of keynote panel sessions and paper presentations with leading researchers in the field.

Projects are a form of organising used to envisage futures – interventions into existing social, technological and natural systems. We are committed to educating and researching project leadership for a digital, net-zero future. This can be achieved by addressing challenges that span a range of industries such as software, organisational change, infrastructure and new energy.

Our series of Project Leadership in a Changing World International Symposia are designed to share the latest thinking on project leadership across an international research, policy and practice community.

Further details will be released closer to the date!

Watch the 2023 Symposium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 (9am AEDT) November and 16 (7pm AEDT) November 2023 (Online)

As we face a changing world it is imperative to think differently about projects and their leadership. The John Grill Institute for Project Leadership’s 2023 International Symposium on Project Leadership in a Changing World” will discuss the latest insights through a series of keynote panel sessions and paper presentations with leading researchers in the field.

Projects are a form of organising used to envisage futures – interventions into existing social, technological and natural systems. We are committed to educating and researching project leadership for a digital, net-zero future. This can be achieved by addressing challenges that span a range of industries such as software, organisational change, infrastructure and new energy.

Our series of Project Leadership in a Changing World International Symposia are designed to share the latest thinking on project leadership across an international research, policy and practice community. 

The Morning Session of our 2023 Third International Symposium on Project Leadership in a Changing World will be held on 9 November at 9am (AEDT) and the Evening Session will take place on 16 November 7pm (AEDT). You can view the agenda and list of speakers below.

Agenda

November 9 (Morning Session – 9am AEDT)


9:00am – 9:15am
Morning: Introductions and Welcome

Speaker: Professor Jennifer Whyte, Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership

9:15am – 9.50am Session 1: Projects and the Energy Transition

Chair: Professor Jennifer Whyte, Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership

Panellists:

  • Mr Chris Ashton, CEO of Worley
  • Mr Terry Chapman, General Manager Project Delivery | Electricity Transmission at APA Group
  • Professor Deanna D’Alessandro, Director of the Sydney Net Zero Initiative

9:50am –10.25am Session 2: Projects for Resilience in a Changing World

Chair: Associate Professor Petr Matous, Associate Head of School (Research) at the School of Project Management

Panellists:

  • Professor Paula Jarzabkowski, Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Queensland
  • Dr Nader Naderpajouh, Interim Head of School at the School of Project Management
  • Mr Roger Swinbourne, Major Projects Sustainability Leader and Consultant

10:25am –11:25am Research Keynotes in Brief

Chair: Associate Professor Julien Pollack, Associate Professor at the School of Project Management

Presentations:

  • Constructing the Sydney Opera House – 50 Year Anniversary by Dr Paolo Stracchi
  • Digital Twins in Projects by Dr Neda Madi
  • Project Governance in Digital Health by Dr Natalie Smith
  • AI in Construction 4.0 by Dr Žiga Turk
  • Sydney Megaproject Ecology by Dr Lara Mottee
  • Policy framework for cross regional cooperation strategies in the Greater Bay Area’s construction industry by Professor Geoffrey Shen

11:25am –11:30am Final Remarks

Speaker: Professor Jennifer Whyte, Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership



November 16 (Evening Session – 7pm AEDT)


7:00pm – 7:10pm
Evening: Introductions and Welcome​

Speaker: Professor Jennifer Whyte, Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership

7:10pm – 7:50pm Session 3: How AI is Changing Project Leadership

Chair: Professor Jennifer Whyte, Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership

Panellists:

  • Professor Stefan Williams, Director of the Digital Sciences Initiative
  • Dr Dicle Kortantamer, Lecturer in Project Management at the University of Leeds
  • Mr Matt Gijselman, Director – Public Policy & Advocacy (APAC) at Bentley Systems

7:50pm – 8.50pm Research Presentations 

Chair: Dr Nader Naderpajouh, Interim Head of School at the School of Project Management

Presentations:

  • Leading psychologically safe digitally-enabled project teams by Dr Eleni Papadonikolaki 
  • Decentralized Project Delivery on the Crypto Common: Conceptualization, Governance Mechanisms, and Future Research Directions by Dr Jens Hunhevics
  • Response strategies for community stakeholder engagement by Associate Professor Ken Chung
  • Designing the transition to operations in large inter-organizational projects: Strategy, structure, process, and people by Ms Xinyue Zhang

8:50pm – 9.00pm Final Comments & Best Research Presentation Award

Speaker: Professor Jennifer Whyte, Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership
Award presenter: Dr Mehdi Rajabi Asadabadi, Lecturer at the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership


Call for Papers – Special Collection: Project Leadership and Society

Please click the icon on the side for more information regarding the publication. Deadline December 15, 2023.

For more details and to submit your paper to the Special Collection, please click here.

3&10 November, 2022

The series of International Symposia are designed to share the latest thinking on project leadership across an international research, policy and practice community. The main audience for this online symposium was our international peers; a secondary audience was the international professional bodies and key client organisations. One outcome was identifying and setting up links with key groups around the world.

The 2023, third International Symposium on Project Leadership in a Changing World will be held on 9 and 16 November. 

Agenda

November 3 (Morning Session)
9:00am – 9:15am Morning: Introductions and Welcome ​
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbd1lTi5e5w

Welcome

Jennifer Whyte is Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Head of School of Project Management, in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sydney (2021-).

She retains a position at Imperial College London, where she was Director of the Centre for Systems Engineering and Innovation, and the Royal Academy of Engineering and Laing O’Rourke Professor of Systems Integration in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (2015-2021), and she retains an affiliation. At Stanford University (2015), she was Shimizu Visiting Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Her first degree is from University of Cambridge and her PhD from Loughborough University. She did postdoctoral research at SPRU, University of Sussex, and Imperial College London.

Her research has led to extensive work with industry and policy. She co-curated the World Economic Forum (WEF) ‘Engineering and Construction’ Transformation Map (2016-2019). She is on the a Senior Advisory Group (2021-) of the UK’s Construction Leadership Council (2019-2021). She sits on the UK’s EPSRC Engineering Strategic Advisory Team; is a Board Member of the ICSF ‘Transforming Construction’ Advisory Board; and previously sat on the MHCLG Building Safely Committee (2018-2019). She has worked with Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority to deliver Singapore’s Integrated Digital Delivery strategy, draw on her research to train more than 100 senior executives.

       

John Grill AO is the Chair of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Chairman of the Board of international resources and energy company WorleyParsons Limited. A prominent Australian business figure, he has been a key supporter of the University of Sydney’s project management research and education initiatives for over a decade – seeking to inspire the next generation of project leaders.

In 2010, John was recognised for his contribution to the engineering profession with an honorary doctorate from the University of Sydney. The close relationship with his alma mater continued and led to the establishment of the John Grill Centre for Project Leadership through a $20 million donation upon his retirement in as Worley CEO in October 2012.

Mr Grill was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in January 2014 in recognition of his contribution to engineering and business in the minerals, energy and power supply industries as well as his commitment to education and training. In 2019, he was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of New South Wales (UNSW).

John also serves as Chairman of the Mindgardens Neuroscience Network - a partnership between the Black Dog Institute, Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), South Eastern Sydney Local Health District (SESLHD) and the University of New South Wales.

Auckland 11:00am
Beijing 6:00am
Berlin 11:00pm
Brisbane 8:00am
Doha 1:00am
Hong Kong 6:00am
London 10:00pm
Los Angeles 2:00pm
Mexico City 4:00pm
New York 5:00pm
Shanghai 6:00am
Singapore 6:00am
Tokyo 7:00am
Zurich 11:00pm


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

9:15am – 9:50am Session 1: Project Teams and Project Leadership  ​

 

Chair:

Associate Professor Julien Pollack is the Deputy Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Research Director at the School of Project Management, University of Sydney. His career in project management began in the Australian public sector delivering organizational change projects - completing an Action Research Ph.D. that won national and international awards. After managing multiple telecommunications and heavy engineering projects, Professor Pollack became an academic in 2011 and joined the University of Sydney in 2016. His research has focused on two broad themes: trends in project management research; and developing project management practice to meet the needs of projects that cannot be pre-defined in simple and stable terms.

    

Project leadership increasingly occurs in the context of increasing risks, requiring adaptability to change, especially as projects grow in duration and complexity. With a focus on the emerging demands that are placed on project leaders and teams, we explore the ways that our existing narrative of project leadership and cultures of team management need to grow to meet capability and lifecycle constraints.

Framing Questions:

  • How do our expectations of project leaders need to change to meet the demands of increasing risk and complexity?
  • What approaches can leaders use to move teams from an expectation of competition to collaboration?
  • Is it reasonable to expect a single individual to lead through all phases of a major project, and if not, what are the implications?

Panel Speakers

Sonya Campbell is the Deputy Secretary, Commercial at New South Wales Treasury and a member of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership’s Advisory Board. Having worked for over 20 years in infrastructure procurement and delivery, she has extensive experience advising government and the private sector on commercial and financial structuring, governance and risk management on complex infrastructure projects. Ms Campbell joined NSW Treasury in September 2018 as Director of the Infrastructure and Structured Finance Unit and has since served as its Executive Director and Head, as well as Deputy Secretary (Acting) of Commercial and Procurement prior to her current role. Before joining NSW Treasury she held senior roles at PwC Australia and Lendlease.

    

Stewart Clegg is a Professor at the School of Project Management at the University of Sydney and a member of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership’s Internal Management Group. He is a world-leading researcher in the fields of organisation studies, power and project management – contributing to over 300 articles in top-tier journals and authoring/editing over 50 books. Professor Clegg is a Virtual Visiting Professor at University of Stavanger, Norway and the Nova School of Business and Economics, Portugal. He has also held roles at at the University of Technology, Sydney since 1976.

    

Dr Jeffrey Pinto is a Professor of Management, Project and Supply Chain Management at the Pennsylvania State University and holds the Andrew Morrow and Elizabeth Lee Black Chair in the Management of Technology in the Sam and Irene Black School of Business. He has consulting experience with a number of major organisations – including General Electric Company and PPG Industries. Dr Pinto has received the Project Management Institute’s Distinguished Contribution Award for outstanding service to the profession on two occasions and its 2009 Research Achievement Award for outstanding contributions to project management research.

    

Auckland 11:15am
Beijing 6:15am
Berlin 11:15pm
Brisbane 8:15am
Doha 1:15am
Hong Kong 6:15am
London 10:15pm
Los Angeles 2:15pm
Mexico City 4:14pm
New York 5:15pm
Shanghai 6:15am
Singapore 6:15am
Tokyo 7:15am
Zurich 11:15pm


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

9:50am –10:25am Session 2: Collaborative Contracts, Project Governance and Set-Up  

 

Chair:

Nuno Gil is a Professor of New Infrastructure Development at the University of Manchester’s Alliance Manchester Business School and a visiting Professor at the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, University of Sydney. His research focuses on the design of structures and processes to create economic and social value. Professor Gil has worked with a number of major government and private sector organisations in the United Kingdom including the London 2012 Olympics, High Speed 2 rail and UK Cabinet – as well as globally with UN-Habitat in Egypt, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA). In 2013, he co-founded the annual workshop series, Megaprojects Workshop: Theory meets Practice.

       

Whilst capital-intensive, project-based sectors have made remarkable progress towards the use of collaborative supplier contracts, the governance of relationships with local communities, local authorities, interest groups, activists and other non-user groups has received much less attention. And yet, as pressure mounts for major projects to produce socially valuable outcomes, good management of these so-called nonmarket stakeholder relationships is  critical if projects are to meet traditional performance expectations.

Framing Questions:

  • What is the value of investing in community benefit agreements?
  • Where to draw the line when dealing with activist groups?
  • What criteria are available to determine the legitimacy of nonmarket stakeholder claims?
  • What conflict-resolution structures are available in the context?

Panel Speakers:

Gemma Whittick is the A/Delivery Director, Sydney Metro for Bechtel Civil Infrastructure. In over a decade with Bechtel, she has worked on major infrastructure projects in Australia and abroad – including as a Principal Delivery Engineer on London’s Crossrail and Chief Mechanical Engineer. Ms Whittick’s experience in the sector spans over a decade, and also includes roles at GBM Minerals Engineering Consultants and Rio Tinto.

Kate Odziemkowska is an Assistant Professor of Strategic Management at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. Her research focuses on nonmarket strategy – with a particular emphasis on formal collaborations and contracts with nonmarket stakeholders such as activists and communities. Ms Odziemkowska serves on the Editorial Boards of the Academy of Management Journal, Organization Science, and the Strategic Management Journal.

    

Peter Colacino is a Partner at Avista Strategy - a strategic consultancy for the infrastructure industry with the ambition on ensuring projects deliver on their promises and potential. He has over 15 years’ experience working with government, academia and industry – recently leading policy development and reform for Infrastructure Australia. Peter has contributed to over 50 policy and planning documents, such as the 2021 Australian Infrastructure Plan. He previously held roles at public transport operator Keolis Downer, and motorway operator Transurban.

        

Auckland 11:50am
Beijing 6:50am
Berlin 11:50pm
Brisbane 8:50am
Doha 1:50am
Hong Kong 6:50am
London 10:50pm
Los Angeles 2:50pm
Mexico City 4:50pm
New York 5:50pm
Shanghai 6:50am
Singapore 6:50am
Tokyo 7:50am
Zurich 11:50pm


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

10:25am –11:25am Research Keynotes in Brief

 

Alliancing and Collaboration on Projects

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHUxaYOzQZI

Derek Walker is an Emeritus Professor at the School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, Melbourne. His research has a particular focus on in infrastructure integrated project delivery and Alliancing. In 2018 Emeritus Professor Walker won the International Project Management Association (IPMA) research excellence award for life time achievements in project management research. He has published over 100 refereed scientific journal papers and 70 book chapters.

    

 

Organising Responses to Climate Change: Mitigation, Adaptation and Suffering as Political Projects?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhmEQMcJ-4A

Christopher Wright is Professor of Organisational Studies at the University of Sydney Business School where he teaches and researches organisational change, management innovation, sustainability and critical understandings of capitalism and political economy. His current research explores organizational and societal responses to climate change, with a particular focus on how managers and business organizations interpret and respond to the climate crisis. Professor Wright’s research on climate change and business is internationally recognised and he has developed research collaborations with leading international climate scientists and global environmental organisations. He is a key researcher at the Sydney Environment Institute, where he heads up a group examining corporate climate transition.

        

 

The Capital Project Dilemma

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5e5RMUMaqHA

Nuno Gil is a Professor of New Infrastructure Development at the University of Manchester’s Alliance Manchester Business School and a visiting Professor at the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, University of Sydney. His research focuses on the design of structures and processes to create economic and social value. Professor Gil has worked with a number of major government and private sector organisations in the United Kingdom including the London 2012 Olympics, High Speed 2 rail and UK Cabinet – as well as globally with UN-Habitat in Egypt, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA). In 2013, he co-founded the annual workshop series, Megaprojects Workshop: Theory meets Practice.

        

 

How Datafication is Reshaping the Project Management Sandbox? 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6W29ma4eLFA

Alejandro Romero-Torres is a Professor in Project Management and Director at the Laboratory of Innovative Practices in Project Context (PICoP), University of Quebec at Montreal. He is also a Global Accreditation Center (GAC) Director at the Project Management Institute. Professor Romero-Torres’ areas of expertise include: information technology adoption, digital transformation of organizations and major engineering and construction projects. His work has appeared in publications such as the Journal of Modern Project Management, World Journal of Social Sciences, and International Journal of Energy and Environment.

        

 

Innovation and Impact of Emerging Technologies in Project Management 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxXpSu0xePg

Dr Muhammad Odeh is an Assistant Teaching Professor in Project and Supply Chain Management at the Pennsylvania State University, Behrend. He spent nine years as a Principal of Data Center Solutions and Global Service lead at Dell EMC and seven years as a Director of Program Delivery for Europe South, Africa and the Middle East. Mr Odeh’s research interests include innovation in project management and PMOs, risk and quality management, cybersecurity and social responsibility, and the impact of emerging and disruptive technologies on project management. His work has recently been published in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Engineering Management Review.

    

 

Megaprojects, Future-Making and Projects as Interventions

Jennifer Whyte is Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Head of School of Project Management, in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sydney (2021-).

She retains a position at Imperial College London, where she was Director of the Centre for Systems Engineering and Innovation, and the Royal Academy of Engineering and Laing O’Rourke Professor of Systems Integration in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (2015-2021), and she retains an affiliation. At Stanford University (2015), she was Shimizu Visiting Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Her first degree is from University of Cambridge and her PhD from Loughborough University. She did postdoctoral research at SPRU, University of Sussex, and Imperial College London.

Her research has led to extensive work with industry and policy. She co-curated the World Economic Forum (WEF) ‘Engineering and Construction’ Transformation Map (2016-2019). She is on the a Senior Advisory Group (2021-) of the UK’s Construction Leadership Council (2019-2021). She sits on the UK’s EPSRC Engineering Strategic Advisory Team; is a Board Member of the ICSF ‘Transforming Construction’ Advisory Board; and previously sat on the MHCLG Building Safely Committee (2018-2019). She has worked with Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority to deliver Singapore’s Integrated Digital Delivery strategy, draw on her research to train more than 100 senior executives.

        

Auckland 12:25pm
Beijing 7:25am
Berlin 12:25am
Brisbane 9:25am
Doha 2:25am
Hong Kong 7:25am
London 11:25pm
Los Angeles 3:25pm
Mexico City 5:25pm
New York 6:25pm
Shanghai 7:25am
Singapore 7:25am
Tokyo 8:25am
Zurich 12:25am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

11:25am-12:00pm Breakout Groups

Group 1: Project Analytics

Dr Nader Naderpajouh is a Senior Lecturer, Director of Research Education and Post Graduate Coordinator at the School of Project Management and member of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership’s Internal Management Group. He leads the Organising for Resilience in the Built Environment (ORIBE) research group and holds an honorary position at RMIT University. Dr Naderpajouh primarily focuses his research on collective actions and organising across social, technical and ecological systems - with a portfolio of research grants totalling over A$14M. He serves as an Associate Editor for journals including the Journal of Management in Engineering by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and as a member of the Editorial Board of journals including the International Journal of Project Management (IJPM).

       

David Porter is the co-founder and Managing Director of Octant AI – a Brisbane-based Artificial Intelligence platform with a vision to utilise technology to sustainably reduce project overruns and create a paradigm change in projects. He holds a Master of Science, Major Project Management from the University of Oxford. With Octant AI, David has worked with organisations such as the World Bank, Hong Kong Development Bureau and Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads.

    

 

Group 2: Collaborative Contracting

Derek Walker is an Emeritus Professor at the School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, Melbourne. His research has a particular focus on in infrastructure integrated project delivery and Alliancing. In 2018 Emeritus Professor Walker won the International Project Management Association (IPMA) research excellence award for life time achievements in project management research. He has published over 100 refereed scientific journal papers and 70 book chapters.

    

 

Group 3: Stakeholder Claims on Project Resources: Where to draw the line?

Nuno Gil is a Professor of New Infrastructure Development at the University of Manchester’s Alliance Manchester Business School and a visiting Professor at the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, University of Sydney. His research focuses on the design of structures and processes to create economic and social value. Professor Gil has worked with a number of major government and private sector organisations in the United Kingdom including the London 2012 Olympics, High Speed 2 rail and UK Cabinet – as well as globally with UN-Habitat in Egypt, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA). In 2013, he co-founded the annual workshop series, Megaprojects Workshop: Theory meets Practice.

        

Peter Colacino is a Partner at Avista Strategy - a strategic consultancy for the infrastructure industry with the ambition on ensuring projects deliver on their promises and potential. He has over 15 years’ experience working with government, academia and industry – recently leading policy development and reform for Infrastructure Australia. Peter has contributed to over 50 policy and planning documents, such as the 2021 Australian Infrastructure Plan. He previously held roles at public transport operator Keolis Downer, and motorway operator Transurban.

        

 

Group 4: Project Leadership – Research and Practice

Jennifer Whyte is Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Head of School of Project Management, in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sydney (2021-).

She retains a position at Imperial College London, where she was Director of the Centre for Systems Engineering and Innovation, and the Royal Academy of Engineering and Laing O’Rourke Professor of Systems Integration in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (2015-2021), and she retains an affiliation. At Stanford University (2015), she was Shimizu Visiting Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Her first degree is from University of Cambridge and her PhD from Loughborough University. She did postdoctoral research at SPRU, University of Sussex, and Imperial College London.

Her research has led to extensive work with industry and policy. She co-curated the World Economic Forum (WEF) ‘Engineering and Construction’ Transformation Map (2016-2019). She is on the a Senior Advisory Group (2021-) of the UK’s Construction Leadership Council (2019-2021). She sits on the UK’s EPSRC Engineering Strategic Advisory Team; is a Board Member of the ICSF ‘Transforming Construction’ Advisory Board; and previously sat on the MHCLG Building Safely Committee (2018-2019). She has worked with Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority to deliver Singapore’s Integrated Digital Delivery strategy, draw on her research to train more than 100 senior executives.

        

Associate Professor Julien Pollack is the Deputy Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Research Director at the School of Project Management, University of Sydney. His career in project management began in the Australian public sector delivering organizational change projects - completing an Action Research Ph.D. that won national and international awards. After managing multiple telecommunications and heavy engineering projects, Professor Pollack became an academic in 2011 and joined the University of Sydney in 2016. His research has focused on two broad themes: trends in project management research; and developing project management practice to meet the needs of projects that cannot be pre-defined in simple and stable terms.

    

Auckland 1:25pm
Beijing 8:25am
Berlin 1:25am
Brisbane 10:25am
Doha 3:25am
Hong Kong 8:25am
London 12:25am
Los Angeles 4:25pm
Mexico City 6:25pm
New York 7:25pm
Shanghai 8:25am
Singapore 8:25am
Tokyo 9:25am
Zurich 1:25am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xGo1Jnwo8U
November 10 (Evening Session)
6:30pm – 6:40pm Evening: Introductions and Welcome​

Welcome

Jennifer Whyte is Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Head of School of Project Management, in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sydney (2021-).

She retains a position at Imperial College London, where she was Director of the Centre for Systems Engineering and Innovation, and the Royal Academy of Engineering and Laing O’Rourke Professor of Systems Integration in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (2015-2021), and she retains an affiliation. At Stanford University (2015), she was Shimizu Visiting Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Her first degree is from University of Cambridge and her PhD from Loughborough University. She did postdoctoral research at SPRU, University of Sussex, and Imperial College London.

Her research has led to extensive work with industry and policy. She co-curated the World Economic Forum (WEF) ‘Engineering and Construction’ Transformation Map (2016-2019). She is on the a Senior Advisory Group (2021-) of the UK’s Construction Leadership Council (2019-2021). She sits on the UK’s EPSRC Engineering Strategic Advisory Team; is a Board Member of the ICSF ‘Transforming Construction’ Advisory Board; and previously sat on the MHCLG Building Safely Committee (2018-2019). She has worked with Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority to deliver Singapore’s Integrated Digital Delivery strategy, draw on her research to train more than 100 senior executives.

       

Auckland 8:30pm
Beijing 3:30pm
Berlin 8:30am
Brisbane 5:30pm
Doha 10:30am
Hong Kong 3:30pm
London 7:30am
Los Angeles 11:30pm
Mexico City 1:30am
New York 2:30am
Shanghai 3:30pm
Singapore 3:30pm
Tokyo 4:30pm
Zurich 8:30am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

6:40pm – 7:15pm Session 3: Projects for Resilience in a Changing World 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciZQKoSIxL4

Chair:

Dr Nader Naderpajouh is a Senior Lecturer, Director of Research Education and Post Graduate Coordinator at the School of Project Management and member of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership’s Internal Management Group. He leads the Organising for Resilience in the Built Environment (ORIBE) research group and holds an honorary position at RMIT University. Dr Naderpajouh primarily focuses his research on collective actions and organising across social, technical and ecological systems - with a portfolio of research grants totalling over A$14M. He serves as an Associate Editor for journals including the Journal of Management in Engineering by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and as a member of the Editorial Board of journals including the International Journal of Project Management (IJPM).

       

Projects do not have a good track record. They have been used extensively as part of the industrial, colonial endeavour that has led to a changing climate. With a focus on short-term gain, large projects in both the developed and developing world have destroyed first nations heritage, been imposed on communities, and displaced peoples. How can we change this track? How do projects in the changing world look like?

Framing Questions:

  • The latest IPCC report asks for immediate, sizeable and meaningful action. What is the role of projects in this urgent context? 
  • What is the role of project leaders in a changing world? 
  • How different is the context of project leadership in a changing world than common forms of leadership?

Panel Speakers:

Professor Martina Linnenluecke is the Director of the Center for Corporate Sustainability and Environmental Finance at Macquarie University, Sydney. Her research focuses on the strategic and financial implications of corporate adaptation and resilience to climate change impacts. Professor Linnenluecke has extensive experience working with government and industry on climate adaptation strategies – and is a chief investigator on several ongoing major research grants. Her work has been recognised through multiple awards, including the Carolyn Dexter Best International Paper Award at the Academy of Management Conference. She is a contributing author to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report and a member of the Australian Research Council (ARC) College of Experts.

       

Markus Hällgren is a Professor of Business Administration at the School of Economics, Umeå University, Sweden. He directs the research program Extreme Environments, Everyday Decisions – which examines leadership and team behaviour in extreme contexts – and runs the international research network Organizing extreme contexts. Professor Hällgren has been published in journals such as The Academy of Management Annals, European Management Journal, Scandinavian Journal of Management, and International Journal of Project Management.

       

Chris Quin is the director and founder of Resilient Projects – a Brisbane-based project management consultancy that specialises in managing projects that increase preparedness and enhance resilience. He has a strong track record of delivering resilience and disaster risk reduction solutions to state and local governments, emergency services and utility providers. A member of the Queensland State Emergency Service, Mr Quin has been awarded the National Emergency Medal on two occasions.

        

Auckland 8:40pm
Beijing 3:40pm
Berlin 8:40am
Brisbane 5:40pm
Doha 10:40am
Hong Kong 3:40pm
London 7:40am
Los Angeles 11:40pm
Mexico City 1:40am
New York 2:40am
Shanghai 3:40pm
Singapore 3:40pm
Tokyo 4:40pm
Zurich 8:40am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

7:15pm – 8:15pm Short Research Presentations [Breakout Rooms]​

*Denotes presenter

Room 1: Project Leadership for a Sustainable Future

Chair:

Dr Luigi Mosca is a postdoctoral research associate at the Center for Systems Engineering and Innovation, at Imperial College London. His research focuses on the intersection of organisation theory, entrepreneurship, and strategic management – with particular emphasis on different forms of online and offline organizing, novel organizational design forms as well as sustainable business model innovation. As part of the Transforming Construction Network Plus project - a joint venture between the Imperial College London, University College London, and Warwick Manufacturing Group – Dr Mosca explored how novel digital technologies enable business model innovation in mature industries such as the construction industry.

        

Presentations:

  • Jose Rodrigo Juarez Cornelio, University of Leeds*
  • Dr Tristano Sainati, University of Leeds
  • Professor Giorgio Locatelli, Polytechnic University of Milan

  • Robert E. Bierwolf, Dutch Ministry of the Interior/Center for Technology & Innovation Management*
  • Pieter Frijns, Dutch Ministry of the Interior

  • Dr Eunice Maytorena-Sanchez, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester*
  • Dr Natalya Sergeeva, The Bartlett School of Sustainable Construction, University College London
  • Professor Graham Winch, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester
 

Room 2: Collaborative Approaches and Stakeholder Management

Chair:

Natalya Sergeeva is an Associate Professor at The Bartlett School of Sustainable Construction, University College London and a visiting academic at Alliance Manchester Business School, Manchester University and University of Reading. Her research focuses on understanding of the ways managers and leaders construct and communicate their narratives and stories and the implications for meaning making, identity work policy making and strategizing. Associate Professor Sergeeva sits at the editorial board of Project Management Journal and has regularly had work published in the International Journal of Project Management, Project Management Journal, Construction Management and Economics, Industrial Marketing Management, International Journal of Innovation Management, European Journal of Innovation Management, Creativity and Innovation Management, Construction Innovation, Engineering Project Organisation Journals.

    

Presentations:

  • Associate Professor Vedran Zerjav, The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London*
  • Dr Francesco Di Maddaloni, The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London
  • Maria Gradillas-Garcia, The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London
  • Dr Luca Sabini, University of Leeds*
  • Professor Daniel Muzio, University of York
  • Professor Stewart Clegg, University of Sydney
  • Daniel M. Hall, Delft University of Technology*
  • Dr Marcella Bonanomi, PoliS-Lombardia
  • Dr Tristano Sainati, School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds*
  • Dr Armando Castro, The Bartlett School of Sustainable Construction, University College London
  • Giacomo Dei, School of Management, Polytechnic University of Milan
  • Professor Giorgio Locatelli, School of Management, Polytechnic University of Milan
  • Professor Jacqui Glass, The Bartlett School of Sustainable Construction, University College London
Auckland 9:15pm
Beijing 4:15pm
Berlin 9:15am
Brisbane 6:15pm
Doha 11:15am
Hong Kong 4:15pm
London 8:15am
Los Angeles 12:15am
Mexico City 2:15am
New York 3:15am
Shanghai 4:15pm
Singapore 4:15pm
Tokyo 5:15pm
Zurich 9:15am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

8:15pm – 8:50pm Session 4: Achieving Net Zero: Projects as Interventions

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYoN2tZLStk

Chair:

Dr Mahshid Tootoonchy is a Lecturer at the School of Project Management, University of Sydney. She is a former lecturer at Operations Management, Supply Chain Management, and Project Management at Sharif University of Technology, Iran.  Prior to academia, Dr Tootoonchy worked with leading international organizations in Oil & Gas industry, including BP.

        

Coping with climate changes requires dynamic planning for efficient use of existing infrastructure, smart integration of new technology, and balancing economic growth and social sustainability. Projects as sudden or modular interventions facilitate the optimisation of supply chains and aggregation of consumer behaviour with operations’ planning.  Our experts will discuss challenges of scenario planning to achieve net-zero, green vs. brown field projects, and the behavioural view of provisions.

Framing Questions:

  • How can projects act as interventions to achieve net zero?
  • How can scholars collaborate to improve delivery, supply-chains and technologies for a net-zero future?
  • What are the associated research challenges? 

Panel Speakers:

Daniel Armanios is the BT Professor of Major Programme Management at the Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. He is also a Distinguished Visiting Professor of Leadership at Tsinghua University, China. Professor Armanios’ research and teaching integrate civil engineering and organizational sociology to better understand how organizations coordinate to build, manage, and maintain infrastructure systems. His findings aim to inform efforts to advance sustainable development, entrepreneurship, and innovation, while also alleviating systemic and persistent inequities.

    

Giorgio Locatelli is a Full Professor of Complex Projects Business at the Polytechnic University of Milan, Italy. His research focus is project management and complex project business – with expertise in the energy, nuclear and space sectors. Professor Locatelli has advised public and private organisations, including the IAEA, ANL, and UK government. He has been a Senior Editor of the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Journal since 2018.

        

Ali Abbas is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Acting Head of the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Sydney. He is a SOAR fellow and Founding Director of the Waste Transformation Research Hub - a national centre aimed at addressing the waste industry’s research and technological challenges. Professor Abbas has 20 years’ experience in the field of Process Systems Engineering and has recently been working on circular economy transitions and identifying ways to translate the circular economy principles into practice. As a leading Australian figure in circular economy, he Chairs the Australian Circular Economy Conference.

        

Auckland 10:15pm
Beijing 5:15pm
Berlin 10:15am
Brisbane 7:15pm
Doha 12:15pm
Hong Kong 5:15pm
London 9:15am
Los Angeles 1:15am
Mexico City 3:15am
New York 4:15am
Shanghai 5:15pm
Singapore 5:15pm
Tokyo 6:15pm
Zurich 10:15am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

8:50pm – 9:00pm Final Comments & Best Research Presentation Award

Closing Words:

Jennifer Whyte is Director of the John Grill Institute for Project Leadership and Head of School of Project Management, in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sydney (2021-).

She retains a position at Imperial College London, where she was Director of the Centre for Systems Engineering and Innovation, and the Royal Academy of Engineering and Laing O’Rourke Professor of Systems Integration in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (2015-2021), and she retains an affiliation. At Stanford University (2015), she was Shimizu Visiting Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Her first degree is from University of Cambridge and her PhD from Loughborough University. She did postdoctoral research at SPRU, University of Sussex, and Imperial College London.

Her research has led to extensive work with industry and policy. She co-curated the World Economic Forum (WEF) ‘Engineering and Construction’ Transformation Map (2016-2019). She is on the a Senior Advisory Group (2021-) of the UK’s Construction Leadership Council (2019-2021). She sits on the UK’s EPSRC Engineering Strategic Advisory Team; is a Board Member of the ICSF ‘Transforming Construction’ Advisory Board; and previously sat on the MHCLG Building Safely Committee (2018-2019). She has worked with Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority to deliver Singapore’s Integrated Digital Delivery strategy, draw on her research to train more than 100 senior executives.

        

Best Research Presentation Award:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gJSSIdK8gY

Dr Mehdi Rajabi Asadabadi is a lecturer at the School of Project Management, University of Sydney. His research focus is expanding knowledge on project and operations management by developing and applying innovative operational research tools and techniques to address problems in large-scale projects. Dr Rajabi Asadabadi has worked on common problems in government projects, ranging from requirement specification to project benefits management. His research has been published journals such as the European Journal of Operational Research, Decision Support Systems, Knowledge Based Systems, and Business and Industrial Marketing.

    

Jose Rodrigo Juarez Cornelio is a PhD Candidate in Project Management at the University of Leeds. He was recently elected Chair of the FIDIC Future Leaders Advisory Council – which represents over one million engineering professionals and 40,000 firms in more than 100 countries worldwide. Mr Juarez also works as Consultant for Mexican firm FOA Consulting – where he has held multiple roles since 2016.

 

Auckland 10:50pm
Beijing 5:50pm
Berlin 10:50am
Brisbane 7:50pm
Doha 12:50pm
Hong Kong 5:50pm
London 9:50am
Los Angeles 1:50am
Mexico City 3:50am
New York 4:50am
Shanghai 5:50pm
Singapore 5:50pm
Tokyo 6:50pm
Zurich 10:50am


See full list of cities on timeanddate.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6QRYoAGygQ
 
Call for Papers – Special Collection: Project Leadership in a Changing World

As we face a changing world, we need to think differently about projects and their leadership. This special collection titled “Project Leadership in a Changing World” is an opportunity to examine the perspectives on leadership that are important to positively intervening in a changing world, in which the natural environment, technologies and society are in flux.

Guest editors:

  • Professor Jennifer Whyte, John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, School of Project Management, University of Sydney. Email: jennifer.whyte@sydney.edu.au
  • Dr. Mehdi Asadabadi, John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, School of Project Management, University of Sydney. Email: mehdi.asadabadi@sydney.edu.au
  • Dr. Nader Naderpajouh, John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, School of Project Management, University of Sydney. Email: nader.naderpajouh@sydney.edu.au

Special issue information:

1. Socialised leadership in projects and the context of a changing world

Projects do not have a good track record. They have been used extensively as part of the industrial, colonial endeavour that has led to a changing climate. With a focus on short-term gain, large projects in both the developed and developing world have destroyed first nations heritage (Joint Standing Committee on Northern 2020), been imposed on communities (Burballa-Noria 2018), and displaced peoples (Gellert and Lynch 2003, Gilbertson 2020).

A significant challenge for project scholars today is to establish, in a changing world, what role projects can play in achieving desirable outcomes for society, and how leadership can enable such outcomes (Whyte et al. 2022). This is not ‘business as usual.’ Scholarship is needed on the shifts in mindset required around what kinds of projects need to be delivered, what communities they affect and what impacts they have on natural environments. One starting point is in the promising new work that reconceives the nature of the project itself, emphasising the collective action and governance questions (Gil and Fu 2021) or shifting from a focus on asset delivery to new forms of projects such as decommissioning (Invernizzi et al. 2020) or threatened species recovery (Willemsen et al. 2020).

As our understandings of projects change, there is a need to reconsider project leadership. The change stimulates as shift in attention from a ‘heroic’ perspective to leadership to more systemic understandings of leadership as a socially situated construct. As we recognise projects as interventions into wider systems, we need to consider how the approach and actions taken by project leaders are embedded within the institutional context of the projects, with connections across organisations and society, and far-reaching consequences for future generations and for natural environments.

To recognise the role of projects as interventions into wider technological, societal and natural contexts (Grafius et al. 2017, Whyte et al. 2019, Whyte and Davies 2021), with predictable and unpredictable stresses and shocks (Naderpajouh et al. 2020), project managers and leaders need to focus on different indicators of project success. Recent studies show this shift is underway in the project studies literatures. For example, Sankaran, Müller et al. (2020) argue for a shift to motivation by a ‘sustainability sublime’ and recent work by Clegg et al. (2021) exposes the necessity of commitment to broader based value and purpose. This takes us far beyond a narrow concern with the incentives for one individual. We believe that achieving outcomes that are desirable, sustainable, resilient and socially just, requires new forms of scholarship that unpacks how project leaders make sense of a changing world.

There is need for more work to articulate the role of project leadership in the uncertain and changing world that we currently find ourselves in, including work on the interconnections between collective and individual actions. In this context, this special collection titled “Project Leadership in a Changing World” is a unique opportunity to enhance our understanding of current challenges in project leadership where leaders face change—with a specific focus on research that emphasises the social structure of leadership and situates actions within the institutional context of projects (Whyte et al., 2022).

2. Challenges and complexities of socialised leadership for projects in a changing world

Projects are future oriented (e.g. Nightingale et al. 2011, Huemann and Silvius 2017), and they reflect societal and political interests. In this context, project leaders are faced with new uncertainties associated with ecological risks, from social unrests, political conflicts, and climate crisis to pandemics, all of which require significant changes in current practices. These changes are interconnected, with dynamics of change in natural environments, technologies and society. Emerging questions range from strategic to tactical concerns and include: what projects do we need in a changing world? How do leaders deal with it, when a changing world becomes impossible to ignore in delivery of a project? How do project leaders make sense of the challenges and opportunities posed by the broader changes in nature, technologies and society?

The socialised approach to project leadership is emphasised as societies are undergoing rapid change as a result of the pressures of changing climate, conflict, disasters, and of encompassing a diversity of communities. For example, a socialised perspective to project leadership is essential in exploring role of projects as interventions to ecological dynamics, where the relationship between projects and natural environments has not been well explored, either in the resource consumption and exploitation through the supply-chain or in displacements that projects entail.

Technological dynamics, particularly in relation to the use of digital information, are also raising new possibilities to transform project delivery (Whyte 2019). While such information may be critical in understanding a project in the context of a changing world, there are new challenges and opportunities for project leadership in the use of project analytics and AI (Wijayasekera et al. 2022). One significant challenge here is to enrol such technologies as they are used by project leaders to discuss, inform and make decisions on the broader transformation agenda, using data to change how projects are delivered, rather than more efficiently delivering ill-adapted projects.

While project management has historically sought to buffer delivery from such wider concerns, the socialised approach to project leadership highlights the perspectives that encompass the diverse societal groups that have interests in the project; and the diverse understandings of value and challenges of political, power dynamics and engagement strategies that such a broader perspective raises. To understand how project leaders make sense of the changing world there is a need to bring together emerging work on a socialised understanding of project leadership (e.g. Whyte et al. 2022), and on the approach and actions of individual leaders (e.g. Merrow and Nandurdikar 2018, Floris and Cuganesan 2019, Drouin et al. 2021).

3. Focus on socialised leadership in a changing world: our call for papers

We are particularly interested in papers that instigate a critical study of socialised approach and encourage studies that provide insights in challenges—such as complexity of decision making in collaborative leadership scenarios, challenges of accountability and its resource intensive requirements, or psychological and organisational nuances that sacrifices efficiency in collective leadership approaches. In addition, we are interested in studying leadership from the organisational point of view instead of common individualistic methodological approaches. In this context, we aim to expand knowledge on how leadership responds to more than one of the dynamics faced in a changing world.

As we seek to foster scholarship on project leadership in a changing world, we share a common interest with this journal, Project Leadership and Society. However, this special issue is specifically focused on the socialised leadership that becomes important in adapting to and managing change, which may require changes in mindset and collective action more than persuasion or delegation of tasks. It encourages scholarship that looks into the interrelationships between managing and leading projects on the one hand, and economic, social, political and organisational contexts, on the other hand. Thus, such work considers projects as embedded within the broader social and organisational context (Aims & scope – Project Leadership and Society | ScienceDirect.com by Elsevier), but has a strong focus on how leadership addresses increasing change. In the context of socialised leadership in a changing world, we welcome a range of submissions that can be related to the following topics, but not exclusively or in any particular order:

  • Achieving desirable outcomes in collaborative context of project leadership
  • Socialised and transformational project leadership
  • Leadership in projects as interventions in wider systems
  • Project leadership and achieving resilience in a changing world
  • Future making as a form of collective inquiry
  • Addressing the differing rates of change within and outside project boundaries
  • Socialised project leadership and management and/or governance
  • Collective decision-making and project goal setting
  • Project leaders within the broader institutional context: the role of individuals in collective shifts
  • Socialised project teams addressing external changes: followers and leaders
  • Socialised project leadership and digital transformation
  • Post-colonial perspectives in collective leadership
  • Critical perspectives on socialised project leadership
  • Data-driven methods and analytics in socialised project leadership
  • Organisational dynamics of socialised project leadership
  • Socialised leadership to achieve sustainable, resilient and just futures
  • Socialised project leadership to achieve net zero: projects as interventions
  • Incentive mechanisms in socialised project leadership
  • Socialised project leadership in context
  • Accountability in socialised project leadership

We are open to related research questions that critically examine socialised approaches to project leadership in a changing world.

Finally, from a methodological perspective, we welcome both theoretical and empirical papers that can contribute significantly to project management theory and practice see the journal’s website for a description of a variety of contributions: Aims & scope - Project Leadership and Society | ScienceDirect.com by Elsevier. However, the papers need to provide detailed and rigorous account of the methodology, as well as a clearly formed theoretical underpinning of the research.

Manuscript submission information:

As members of John Grill Institute for Project Leadership, the guest editors invite authors to participate in the annual Project Leadership in a Changing World symposium (in November 2022 and 2023), which may assist with articulating a well aligned submission to this special collection.

Important date: Submission due date: Dec 15, 2023

Early submissions are encouraged, and papers will be published on the rolling basis as they come in. The peer reviewing process starts as we receive the submission. Where submissions are made on December 15, 2023, the authors should expect the first decision by April 2024 and final decision by August 2024.

For author guidelines, please visit the website of the journal at:

https://www.elsevier.com/journals/project-leadership-and-society/2666-7215/guide-for-authors

References:

Burballa-Noria, A. (2018) The Case of the Forum against Unnecessary and Imposed Megaprojects. Apostolopoulou, E. and Cortes-Vazquez, J.A. (Eds.) The Right to Nature: Social Movements, Environmental Justice and Neoliberal Natures (pp. 155-167).

Clegg, S. R., Skyttermoen, T. and Vaagaasar, A. L. (2021) Project Management: A Value Creation Approach. London, Sage.

Drouin, N., van Marrewijk, A. and Müller, R. (2021) Megaproject Leaders: Reflections on Personal Life Stories, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Floris, M. and Cuganesan, S. (2019) Project Leaders in Transition: Manifestations of Cognitive and Emotional Capacity. International Journal of Project Management, 37(3), 517-532.

Gellert, P. K. and Lynch, B. D. (2003) Mega‐Projects as Displacements. International Social Science Journal 55(175): 15-25.

Gil, N. A. and Fu, Y. (2021) Megaproject Performance, Value Creation, and Value Distribution: An Organizational Governance Perspective. Academy of Management Discoveries, 8(2), 224-251.

Gilbertson, T. (2020) Compensating for Development at the in-between and Edges of Extractive Capitalism: Socio-Nature and Cultural Erasure in the Northeast Caribbean Colombian Coal Mining Region, PhD thesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee.

Grafius, D., Kim, H. and Whyte, J. (2017) Ecological Interdependencies of Infrastructure Projects. International Symposium on Next Generation Infrastructure, London, UK, 13-15 September.

Huemann, M. and Silvius, G. (2017) Projects to Create the Future: Managing Projects Meets Sustainable Development. International Journal of Project Management, 35(6), 1066-1070.

Invernizzi, D. C., Locatelli, G., Velenturf, A., Love, P. E., Purnell, P. and Brookes, N. J. (2020) Developing Policies for the End-of-Life of Energy Infrastructure: Coming to Terms with the Challenges of Decommissioning. Energy Policy, 144: 111677.

Joint Standing Committee on Northern, A. (2020) Never Again: Inquiry into the Destruction of 46,000-Year-Old Caves at the Juukan Gorge in the Pilbara Region of Western Australia - Interim Report, Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia, Retrieved.

Merrow, E. W. and Nandurdikar, N. (2018) Leading Complex Projects a Data-Driven Approach to Mastering the Human Side of Project Management, Wiley.

Naderpajouh, N., Matinheikki, J., Keeys, L. A., Aldrich, D. P. and Linkov, I. (2020) Resilience and Projects: An Interdisciplinary Crossroad. Project Leadership and Society, 1: ,100001.

Nightingale, P., Baden-Fuller, C. and Hopkins, M. M. (2011) Projects, Project Capabilities and Project Organizations. Advances in Strategic Management, 28: 215-234.

Sankaran, S., Müller, R. and Drouin, N. (2020) Creating a ‘Sustainability Sublime’ to Enable Megaprojects to Meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Systems Research and Behavioral Science, 37(5): 813-826.

Whyte, J. (2019) How Digital Information Transforms Project Delivery Models. Project Management Journal, 50(2), 177-194.

Whyte, J. and Davies, A. (2021) Reframing Systems Integration: A Process Perspective on Projects. Project Management Journal, 52(3): 237-249.

Whyte, J., Fitzgerald, J., Mayfield, M., Coca, D., Pierce, K. and Shah, N. (2019) Projects as Interventions in Infrastructure Systems‐of‐Systems. IInternational Committee on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) International Symposium, Orlando, USA, 20-25 July.

Whyte, J., Naderpajouh, N., Clegg, S., Matous, P., Pollack, J. and Crawford, L. (2022) Project Leadership: A Research Agenda for a Changing World. Project Leadership and Society 3: 100044.

Wijayasekera, S. C., Hussain, S. A., Paudel, A., Paudel, B., Steen, J., Sadiq, R. and Hewage, K. (2022) Data Analytics and Artificial Intelligence in the Complex Environment of Megaprojects: Implications for Practitioners and Project Organizing Theory. Project Management Journal 53(5), 485-500.

Willemsen, M., Pollack, J. and Algeo, C. (2020) The Role of Project Management in Threatened Species Recovery. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 13(5): 981-998.

Keywords:

Projects, project leadership, ecological, society

Why publish in this Special Issue?

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Learn more about the benefits of publishing in a special issue: https://www.elsevier.com/authors/submit-your-paper/special-issues

Interested in becoming a guest editor? Discover the benefits of guest editing a special issue and the valuable contribution that you can make to your field: https://www.elsevier.com/editors/role-of-an-editor/guest-editors

 

The 1st International Symposium on Project Leadership in a Changing World was held online on 10 November 2021.

Click here to access the agenda, videos of the sessions and other details of this symposium.

10 November, 2021

The John Grill Institute for Project Leadership hosted an international symposium with leading researchers in the field on 10 November 2021.
 
This symposium gave a broad overview of current research in the field of project leadership and its potential impact on how projects are delivered in a changing world. It kicked off the new research directions of the Institute on project sponsorship, management and governance: project models and digital transformation, organizational dynamics of projects, and projects for sustainable, resilient and just futures.
 
The main purpose of this online symposium is to share the latest thinking on project leadership across an international research, policy and practice community. The main audience for this online symposium is our international peers; a secondary audience is the international professional bodies and key client organizations.
 
The Symposium covered the following topics in four sessions: Project Leadership; Insights on Project Leadership for a Changing World; Leadership and Governance; Temporary Multi-Level Organising across Portfolios, Programs and Projects. There was also a session on Research Developments.
 
Our speakers included John Grill, Professor Lynn Crawford, Professor Stewart Clegg, Professor Jennifer Whyte and many other distinguished international experts.